The Importance of Being Beaten Up

I had a very valuable lesson proved to me today.

For the last couple of weeks I’ve had mostly very skilled training partners. As I’ve been saying in a lot of my posts, the sessions have been pretty gruelling, the kind that end with me flopping around on the floor gasping for air under someone’s knee-on-belly like a dolphin who’s suddenly woken up in the desert and doesn’t know what’s going on.

Me getting owned at the All-Kyushu championships

In each of these sessions, I made sure that I kept pushing and pushing right up until the last bell. Trying that hip escape even though it felt futile. Going for that sweep even if I knew I didn’t have the energy to complete it. Trying to lock in the triangle despite my legs feeling like jelly.

These kind of spars are not fun. They are tiring and demoralising and a lot of people, myself included, avoid them all too often. As the bell goes between rounds and we search for our next partner, we size people up… should I go with the whitebelt or the new blue belt who I can throw around and dominate and submit and have fun with or should I go with the big strong purple belt or my coach who will likely tie me up in painful shapes? We all occasionally choose the former, but we probably know we should be doing the latter.

Of course, rolling with lower belts and people who pose you no real threat is good sometimes. We need a chance to work on technique, on attack, without having to worry about strength or being on the defensive all the time. And it’s good for the new belts to roll with higher belts, conversely.

Today, the last few sessions paid off for me. It’s simple: when you roll against someone much better or much stronger than you and you push yourself to try that hip escape or fight off that triangle, even if it doesn’t work, then when you go back to rolling with someone of your level, such as someone you might run into at a competition, you’ll find that the hip escape that didn’t work on your instructor saves your butt. The triangle that the purple belt laid on you and you were able to fight off makes the triangles that the blues and whites put on you feel like nothing. That sweep that you couldn’t nail against your coach but tried anyway, works against someone of your level.

Anyway, point is, it is true what they saying. If you aren’t tapping, you aren’t learning. And the other thing they probably say. What is it. Something about not taking the easy way. Or that hard work pays off. Train hard fight easy. Strike while the iron’s hot. Never mix orange juice and milk. Gear before beer have no fear. Or… shit. Anyway, you know.

Advertisements

3 Responses

  1. […] Farts The Importance of Being Beaten UpBJJ April 13Josh GrossJudo 9 April and BJJ 11 AprilUFC 83TUF Shit – An Ultimate Fighter BlogJapanese […]

  2. […] I think I thought about taking a nap right there. But feeling empowered from Supercrap’s post on pushing yourself, I decided to keep on sparring, even though I didn’t have enough energy to even stand up. […]

  3. […] I think I thought about taking a nap right there. But feeling empowered from Supercrap’s post on pushing yourself, I decided to keep on sparring, even though I didn’t have enough energy to even stand up. […]

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: